Colloquium

Title

Modularity in vertex operator algebras

Date

2018.6.27 (Wed) 16:30-17:30    (16:00- tea)

Place

Rm110, Research Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Kyoto University

Speaker

Chongying Dong (RIMS & University of California, Santa Cruz)

Abstract

 Modular invariance of characters of a rational conformal field theory has been known since the work of Cardy. It was proved by Zhu that the the space spanned by the irreducible characters of a rational vertex operator algebras is a representation of the full modular group. This representation is a powerful tool in the study of vertex operator algebras and conformal field theory. It conceives many intriguing arithmetic properties, and the Verlinde formula is certainly a notable example. It has been conjectured my people that the kernel of this representation is a congruence subgroup, or the irreducible characters are modular functions on a congruence subgroup. This expository talk will survey our recent proof of this conjecture.

Comment

Title

Time-series analysis based on delay coordinate - embedding, integral operator, Groebner basis

Date

2018.6.20 (Wed) 16:30-17:30    (16:00- tea)

Place

Rm110, Building No.3, Faculty of Science, Kyoto University

Speaker

Naoto Nakano (Kyoto University)

Comment

Title

Fast reaction limit problems: analysis and applications

Date

2018.6.13 (Wed) 16:30-17:30    (16:00- tea)

Place

Rm110, Research Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Kyoto University

Speaker

Hideki Murakawa (Kyushu University)

Comment

Title

Maximally writhed real algebraic knots and links

Date

2018.6.6 (Wed) 16:30-17:30    (16:00- tea)

Place

Rm110, Building No.3, Faculty of Science, Kyoto University

Speaker

Grigory Mikhalkin (University of Geneva)

Abstract

 The Alexander-Briggs tabulation of knots in R^3 (started almost a century ago, and considered as one of the most traditional ones in classical Knot Theory) is based on the minimal number of crossings for a knot diagram. From the point of view of Real Algebraic Geometry it is more natural to consider knots in RP^3 rather than R^3, and also to use a different number also serving as a measure of complexity of a knot: the minimal degree of a real algebraic curve representing the knot.
 As it was noticed by Oleg Viro about 20 years ago, the writhe of a knot diagram becomes an invariant of a knot in the real algebraic set-up, and corresponds to a Vassiliev invariant of degree 1. In the talk we'll briefly survey these notions, and consider the knots with the maximal possible writhe for its degree. Surprisingly, it turns out that there is a unique maximally writhed knot in RP^3 for every degree d. Furthermore, this real algebraic knot type has a number of characteristic properties, from the minimal number of diagram crossing points (equal to d(d-3)/2) to the minimal number of transverse intersections with a plane (equal to d-2). Based on a series of joint works with Stepan Orevkov.
[pdf]

Comment

Title

Mathematical aspects of numerical computation

Date

2018.5.30 (Wed) 16:30-17:30    (16:00- tea)

Place

Rm110, Research Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Kyoto University

Speaker

Koya Sakakibara (Kyoto University)

Comment

Title

An algorithm for weighted linear matroid parity problem

Date

2018.5.23 (Wed) 16:30-17:30    (16:00- tea)

Place

Rm110, Building No.3, Faculty of Science, Kyoto University

Speaker

Yusuke Kobayashi (RIMS, Kyoto University)

Comment

Title

Birational boundedness of algebraic varieties

Date

2018.5.16 (Wed) 14:40-15:40

Place

Rm420, Research Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Kyoto University

Speaker

Christopher Hacon (Kyoto University / The University of Utah)

Abstract

 Algebraic varieties are geometric objects defined by polynomial equations. The minimal model program (MMP) is an ambitous program that aims to classify algebraic varieties. According to the MMP, there are 3 building blocks: Fano varieties, Calabi-Yau varieties and varieties of general type. In this talk I will recall the general features of the MMP and discuss recent advances in our understanding of Fano varieties and varieties of general type.

Comment 15:40-16:30 Tea Break (Rm110)

Title

Global dynamics of the nonlinear Schrodinger equation with potential

Date

2018.5.16 (Wed) 16:30-17:30

Place

Rm420, Research Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Kyoto University

Speaker

Kenji Nakanishi (RIMS, Kyoto University)

Abstract

 Nonlinear dispersive equations describe wave evolution with strong interactions in various physical contexts, such as plasma, superfluid, and water waves. Each equation typically produces many types of solutions, such as scattering, solitons, and blow-up, by competition between the dispersion and the interactions. Recent progress in the space-time analysis, combined with the variational arguments as well as those in the dynamical system and in the spectral theory, has enabled us to study global behavior of large solutions, but the relation between different types is still to be explored.
 In this talk, we consider the nonlinear Schrodinger equation in three dimensions with attractive linear potential and nonlinear interaction, as a simple model case with the four typical solutions: scattering, blow-up, stable solitons and unstable solitons. Restricting the solutions by small mass and energy slightly above the first excited states, we can classify them into 9 sets by global behavior. The blow-up solutions are separated from the solutions scattering to the ground states, by an invariant manifold of codimension one, which is around translations of the potential-free ground state. The transverse intersection of the manifold and its time inversion gives the nine-set decomposition. The dynamic transition from the scattering to the blow-up is stable, taking place near the first excited states once and for all.

Comment 15:40-16:30 Tea Break (Rm110)

Title

Superpolynomials of plane curve singularities and zeta-functions

Date

2018.5.9 (Wed) 16:30-17:30    (16:00- tea)

Place

Rm110, Building No.3, Faculty of Science, Kyoto University

Speaker

Ivan Cherednik (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

Abstract

 The talk will be about a recent surprising development in the highly interdisciplinary theory of superpolynomials of plane curve singularities, connecting them with the zeta-functions of the corresponding rings over finite fields. The superpolynomials are stable Khovanov-Rozansky polynomials of algebraic links, which conjecturally coincide with the DAHA superpolynomials and those describing the BPS states in string theory. They are also directly related to affine Springer fibers, $p$-adic orbital integrals and Hilbert schemes of plane curve singularities and the complex plane. The zeta-functions are essentially due to Galkin and Stohr (though we will need some generalization), a very classical direction in number theory. Their definition and examples will be provided and we will formulate a positivity conjecture connecting them with Jacobian factors of plane curve singularities (local factors of the compactifeid Jacobians).

Comment

Title

Normal closures of slope elements of knot groups

Date

2018.5.2 (Wed) 16:30-17:30    (16:00- tea)

Place

Rm110, Research Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Kyoto University

Speaker

Tetsuya Itoh (Kyoto University)

Comment

Title

A reconfigurable information-flow semantics for functional programs

Date

2018.4.25 (Wed) 16:30-17:30    (16:00- tea)

Place

Rm110, Building No.3, Faculty of Science, Kyoto University

Speaker

Koko Muroya (RIMS, Kyoto University & University of Birmingham)

Abstract

 We introduce a new semantic framework---dynamic Geometry of Interaction (dynamic GoI)---for functional programming, as a combination of two styles of program semantics: information-flow and graph-rewriting. A program is interpreted as a network (graph), and program evaluation is modelled using information flow on networks that can be dynamically reconfigured at run-time via graph rewriting. Our starting point is a particular instance of the information-flow semantics, which is Girard's Geometry of Interaction (GoI), a semantic framework to interpret proofs in Linear Logic. It is then interleaved with graph rewriting, on the key principle that the dynamic rewriting is guided and controlled by information flow. This talk gives an overview of development of the dynamic GoI framework, with discussion on its ability to model both intensional and extensional aspects of program evaluation.

Comment

Title

Coset construction and quantum geometric Langlands program

Date

2018.4.18 (Wed) 16:30-17:30    (16:00- tea)

Place

Rm110, Research Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Kyoto University

Speaker

Tomoyuki Arakawa (RIMS, Kyoto University)

Abstract

 Coset construction is a well-known method to obtain new vertex algebras from known ones. Recently, Davide Gaiotto had started to give new interpretations of coset construction in terms of 4d gauge theories and the geometric Langlands program. In this lecture I first talk about my joint work with Thomas Creutzig and Andrew Linshaw that proves a long-standing conjecture on the coset construction of W-algebras. Then I explain the method used in this work also proves a conjecture of Dennis Gaitsgory that is crucially used in the quantum geometric Langlands program.

Comment

Title

Operator Algebras and Conformal Field Theory

Date

2018.4.11 (Wed) 16:30-17:30    (16:00- tea)

Place

Rm110, Building No.3, Faculty of Science, Kyoto University

Speaker

Yasuyuki Kawahigashi (The University of Tokyo)

Comment

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